A world without joints?


Shakespear

It’s a mirage in itself as to what the world as a whole is and what is the purpose which it stands for. Is there some God who created it or it just emerged at  its own with or without any massive volcanic eruptions devastatingly colluding with one another and the resultant mass was called the world. But authenticity part on this version is still sans an acceptable truth. What historians and anthropologists talk on the subject is all guess based. The role of the mythologists too has worsened the confusion in a form worse confounded.

We can of course talk about the real world of which we are the inhabitants, we can visibly see it, we can use it, we can share our views with one another candidly and frankly, and above all we can secure some little space somewhere as our own with plenty of ifs and buts to add or subtract from any where to any where. If it suits Jigar Moradabadi, an eminent Urdu poet he fumes and frowns saying “…na jaane kidhar se na jaane kidhar ko, azal se abad tak baha jaa raha hoon…”. As if it was not enough, Shakespeare finds the world as a whole suffering from loopholes and his Hamlet proclaims that he is the one born to set these disorders fixed. Hamlet cries with a shriek “The world is without joints and I am born to set it right”. The world continues the way it suits it and the critics have no pause against whatever they could at the maximum, say beyond a limit. We may have to keep ourselves contended that there are actually two worlds –one that we could never see and the other one that we could see with snags at every step.

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