Why not call a woman as ‘Sir’?


A senior woman police officer, Sarah Rizvi, an IPS of the rank of Superintendent Police, in Gujarat took an exception when she was addressed by the press reporters as Madam and Bahenji. When press fellows asked her as to what was her preference for the purpose, her prompt reply was ‘Call me as Sir’. This was an amazement to all the people present there. She was correct in the sense that if the right of equality was a clamour in every field, why leave the area of calling virtual names as untouched. If a man can be called as ‘Sir’, why not the women too. Certain decades back, it was unthinkable for the ladies to serve as police officers, but it was made possible with the slogan of equality. Indian constitution provides rights of equality in an ample measure, but it failed to literally equate the women with men in the matter of the gender obviously for the simple reason that it was not in their hands to equate the gender in biological terms. May be the men folk claim to wear a vermillion mark on their forehead as mark of a married man on the basis of parity with their female counterparts. ‘Sir’ part can be managed some how as its usage is denotative of a protocol, but what about their very names. Can the lady under reference be called as Mr. Sarah Rizvi, or male counterpart of a married woman as Mrs. xyz. Moreover, different English dictionaries in the whole world will require to be corrected on several words distinguishing a male against a female. The story in any case doesn’t end with the address ‘Sir’, and to cover the total gender identity is not only utopian, it is some thing that is practically unimaginable.

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13 thoughts on “Why not call a woman as ‘Sir’?”

  1. For Ms Sarah Rizvi. Superintendent, is the correct address. Especially from those whom she serves, the public.

    Ms. Sara Rizvi, will one day come face to face with old father time. Let’s see how arrogant she is then?

    I am a person who believes in equality, as far as it may go. However calling anyone sir, implies a feudal system. Which is unequal. I guess if any woman wants to be called sir? I find that amusing. Still, the world is an unequal place.

    In a retail setting, a small Sir, is expected. I would not so address a woman. It would be Ms. or Madam.

    I might address Guru as “Sir”? For Guru deserves most respect. If Guru was woman? “Madam”. Or anything asked by them.

    I would not want to be addressed as “Sir”. I prefer Mr. my name James, or job title if relevant.

    My ego is not so developed, so as to believe myself to be. Any more or less, than just another homo sapiens. Not the crown of creation, or anything so egotistical.

    People have an over-developed sense of importance, in this world. Nobody is indispensable! Get over it.

    When we were children, we always muttered an “f” at the end of the word “sir”. Childish, I agree! The play on the english word of “serf”. Yet somehow appropriate, in this context.

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  2. I THINK THAT SARAH RIZVI TAKING EXCEPTION ON BEING ADDRESSED OR CALLED MADAM/BAHENJI IS REALLY EXCEPTION AND EXCEPTIONS ARE ALWAYS THERE AS NO LADY WOULD EVER LIKE TO BE CALLED ‘SIR’. THE CASE OF SARAH RIZVI IS CERTAINLY AMUSING AND I AGREE WITH YOU THAT IT IS SOME THING THAT IS PRACTICALLY UNIMAGINABLE.

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  3. Good logic but I think that this logic would not be acceptable to whole of the women because they have their own seperate identity.

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  4. The nomenclature with which a person identifies himself/herself should be the reference name for him/her. For there are instances when name is not required to be used and a sir /madam can change the situation.even a corporate term”BOss” is very effective and dominating.our system hardly allows anyone to mentally or practically change the usual ways,but such person of her stature and personality can surely bring changes

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    1. I feel amply satiated with volley of your comments and the ‘Likes’, Soumya. I hope such a measure on your part helps us to form a tie of the order of a bond of nearness. Thank you so much.

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  5. Sir… Salute to ” Sir Sara Rizvi”.. Inspiring by him (her) someday a lady may ask her husband to concieve and ask her children to call her as father… Hence the children shall have two father but no mother.. Sir imagine a society having no mother but father and father every where… Ultimately all the fathers will go to God requesting for a mother…. Perhaps then Sara Rizvi sir will again reborn to feel the dignity and greatness of being madam —- Respected madam…….

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