Does courtesy really beget courtesy?– Part (2)


continued

Emanating from what is currently obtaining in the society, one generally gets prone to fall in line with it, as this is a natural psychological factor that works uniformly with all. Exceptional cases are only that of those who are hard core believers in routine ethics. As the history says, Amar Singh Rathore, Governor of Nagaur in Madhya Pradesh in 1640s, representing Moghals, was passing through some desert with his army, where he came across an young man Narsebaz Pathan, who was thirsty and was nearly collapsing for want of water. Amar Singh Rathore ordered a jug of water for him giving him instant relief saving his life. As a return courtesy, Pathan offered his services to Amar Singh Rathore, which he accepted. In course of time, Amar Singh was attacked by his enemies and at a juncture his own life was  in danger. Narsebaz Pathan rushed to the spot and was able to save him fighting the enemies, but he himself succumbed to injuries inflicted upon him and he died as a martyr. His dying words were that his was a life saved by Amar Singh Rathore and he was only returning his debt by accepting his own death for him. This is history with an extreme instance of sacrifice as a return courtesy, and expecting that all the people have to fall in line with him like this is just utopian. This may suffice if normal courtesies in day today life are accepted and returned with the requisite element of normality in different fields of activity.

Any body any where in any field can accept and return the courtesy if the individual concerned has intentions as such. I am a writer using blogging as a necessary platform for the purpose obviously coming across lot many bloggers, writers and readers. As a blogger, I owe my fellow bloggers, followers and the readers a due acknowledgement as a courtesy to what they do for me. I do it with utmost anxiety at my command attending to their responses on my blogs quite in a meticulous order going through each of them individually. Even if I have to forego my other urgency based pre-occupations for the purpose, I do it. On the other hand, what I very often find is just contrary to what I do. Bloggers at the other end, particularly those who are the bigger ones, hardly return such courtesies, some exceptions apart. It happens more in the case of blog followers. One blog follower not following his/ her co blog follower quite on a reciprocal footing is not what is most warranted. Bloggers’ is a community in itself where reciprocity is the foremost factor to be adhered to.   …Concluded.

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8 thoughts on “Does courtesy really beget courtesy?– Part (2)”

  1. When you roll back the word ‘courtesy’ to trace its roots in the history, the whole experience of reading the blog becomes so amazing and the curiosity still remains to know what is going to follow next. It teaches us to understand the redefined meaning of English word courtesy in the context of our traditions and from the view point of our ancestors. Great writing.

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  2. Sir,
    Now a days philosophies of Mr. Gandhi and Narsebaz Pathan are hardly followed.
    Though Courtesy, generosity etc are heavenly quality and come from within in an human being but it depends on our society also. As you rightly said that if one offers his another cheek it will be taken as an opportunity.
    In the present age also people are practicing these virtues (courtesy, generosity…) but up to one extent only till they have assurance that they are going nothing to loose.
    As usual, with a unique style of explanation, in conclusion you have taught us a lesson that courtesy and sincerity can also be shown by small things also without any physical and financial loss.
    Thank you sir…

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  3. Sir.. Nasebaaz Pathan like people are rare species on earth but such type of people exists, it is great…. I salute such people…
    Big thanks to you sir for elucidating characters of such type of brave man….

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